History

Purpose of study

At St Joseph’s Catholic Primary School, the overarching aim for our history curriculum is to develop pupils’ learning so that they can acquire the appropriate subject knowledge, skills and understanding, which promotes their spiritual, moral, cultural, mental and physical development and prepares them for the opportunities, responsibilities and experience for later life. We believe our history teaching should enable pupils to gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and the wider world. It should inspire their curiosity to know more about the past and equip them to ask perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence, sift arguments, and develop perspective and judgement. We aim to help pupils’ understand the complexity of people’s lives, the process of change, the diversity of societies and relationships between different groups, and their own identity and the challenges of their time. Our history curriculum helps to develop the pupils’ reading skills.

Our History education will help pupils gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past and that of the wider world. It inspires pupils’ curiosity to know more about the past. The teaching equips pupils to ask perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence, sift arguments and develop perspective and judgement. History helps pupils understand the complexity of people’s lives, the process of change, the diversity of societies and relationships between different groups, and their own identity and the challenges of their time.

Intent

Our curriculum for History ensures that all pupils:

  • know and understand the history of these islands as a coherent, chronological narrative, from the earliest times to the present day: how people’s lives have shaped this nation and how Britain has influenced and been influenced by the wider world;
  • know and understand significant aspects of the history of the wider world: the nature of ancient civilisations; the expansion and dissolution of empires; characteristic features of past non-European societies; achievements and follies of mankind;
  • gain and deploy a historically grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘empire’, ‘civilisation’, ‘parliament’ and ‘peasantry’;
  • understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance and use them to make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically valid questions and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and analyses;
  • understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed;
  • gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts, understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history; between cultural, economic, military, political, religious and social history; and between short- and long-term timescales.

In summary, our curriculum:

  • Develops learning that meets the appropriate subject knowledge, skills and understanding required by the National Curriculum and results in the acquisition of historical knowledge and skills – that equip pupils in enquiry, research, evaluation and analyses in History.
  • Allows pupils to know more, remember more and understand more.
  • Increases pupils’ understanding of the present in the context of the past
  • Develop pupils’ interest in the past, arousing curiosity and motivation to learn

The clear and comprehensive programme of study we have adopted at St Joseph’s Catholic Primary School works in line with the National Curriculum aims:

  • To ensures that all pupils know and understand the history of Britain as a coherent, chronological narrative, from the earliest times to the present day: how people’s lives have shaped this nation and how Britain has influenced and has been influenced by the wider world.
  • To ensure pupils know and understand significant aspects of the history of the wider world: the nature of ancient civilisations; the expansion and dissolution of empires; characteristics features of past non-European societies; achievements and follies of mankind.
  • To ensure pupils gain and deploy a historically grounded understanding of abstract terms.
  • To ensure pupils understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance, and use them to make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically valid questions and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and analyses.
  • To ensure pupils understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed.
  • To ensure pupils gain historical perspective by placing their growing knowledge into different contexts understanding the connections between local, regional, national and international history; between cultural, economic, military, political, religious and social history; and between short and long term timescales.

In summary, we aim to implement this by:

  • Using a clear, comprehensive programme of study that fulfils the National Curriculum requirements and allows the pupils to know more, remember more and understand more
  • Knowledge Organisers and Knowledge Walls
    1. To give pupils key knowledge of where people and events studied fit within a chronological framework and identify similarities and differences between ways of life in different periods.
    2. To develop pupils’ use of a wide vocabulary of everyday historical terms -language and meaning to common words and phrases relating to the passing of time.
  • Class timelines – each class, has a timeline that follows them throughout the school. This records all previous history learning and enables children to put new learning in the context of what has already been learnt.
  • Resources – books, artefacts, photos, videos etc. –
  • Educational visits where possible to support and develop pupils learning.

The Structure of a History Lesson at St Joseph’s Catholic Primary School

One History topic will be studied each term over a half-term period [3 topics per year]. One hour per week is then dedicated to each lesson.

Each unit of work is broken down into 5-6 ancillary questions, during which children will be taught the purpose and context of the subject matter being taught.

During the course of study, many cross-curricular links will be made to other subjects. Consistent links are made to subjects such as English [Spoken Language as well as reading and writing], Maths, Science, Computing and Religious Education. Occasional links are also made to Geography, Design and Technology and Art and Design.

Homework

Pupils may be set homework from time to time to consolidate and practice the work they have learnt in class.

Planning

History Long Term Plan

Progression of History Skills, Knowledge and Understanding

Documents below detail the knowledge and skills that pupils will gain at each stage of the curriculum in each of the following domains: Chronological Understanding; Knowledge and Interpretation, plus Historical Skills and Enquiries.

KS1 Progression

KS2 Progression

 

Progression of Vocabulary

Progression of Vocabulary

Impact

  • Children will understand and use the key skills of:
    • Chronological Understanding
    • Knowledge and understanding of events in the past
    • Historical Interpretation
    • Historical Enquiry
    • Organisation and Communication
  • Children will know more, remember more and understand more about History
  • Children will use their historical skills in enquiry, analysis, evaluation and argument
  • Children will learn lessons from History to influence the decisions they make in their lives in the future – they will be more curious and motivated to learn about the past
  • The large majority of children will achieve age-related expectations by the end of the year

Age-related endpoints for each unit in each year group in the following domains – Chronological Understanding; Historical Enquiry; Historical Interpretation; Organisation and Communication and Understanding of Events, People and Changes.

History End Points

Assessment – Assessment for learning is carried out throughout each lesson taught through observation. Live nudges are used as and when needed, and some formative and summative assessments are carried out throughout the year.

Moderation:

  1. In-house
  2. Cross-school
  3. Local Authority
  4. All of the above will be monitored and discussed during pupil progress meetings and staff performance management.